Learn French Beading >> Intermediate Course Lesson Five: Scallops

Intermediate Course​

Lesson Five: Scallops

TERMS TO REMEMBER: 

  • Scallops
  • Scallop count
  • Re-positioning the Working Wire
  • Winged Scallop

View my video demonstration of the Scallop technique on Youtube: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZl7NW5uYUs&t=9s

Before learning about French Beaded Scallops you will need to know the Basic Frame technique. Loop-Back will also be helpful, but not necessary.

Scallops are another add-on technique that can be built on top of any base technique, though it’s most commonly used on the Basic Frame. A Scallop is basically a Loop-Back that attaches to the petal. It creates a scalloped or serrated edge on a leaf or petal. 

Unlike most french beading techniques, scallops cannot be worked from the spool. You will have to cut wire every time. I find a bead spinner to be very handy while making scallops, since you will be adding and removing beads frequently. You also do not want to pre-string all of the beads onto the wire before beginning. 

For this exercise, use 24 gauge (.5 mm) wire and size 11/0 seed beads.

A pattern that uses scallops will look something like this: 

Make 1: 5 row Basic Frame, 10 bead Basic Row, RB PT.

  • Measure and cut 2 ft (~61 cm) of wire. 
  • Add scallops at 5, 7, and 9 on each side. (These numbers are called Scallop Counts. They are bead counts that tell you where to place each set of scallops.)
  • Reduce to two bottom wires.
You may see a picture or chart similar to Photo 1 that gives a visual guide for the scallop counts. 
 
 
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 1
  1. Construct a Basic Frame using 10 beads for the Basic Row. Wrap rows 2-5 with a round bottom and pointed top.  
  2. Count 5 beads down from the top of the outer row on the left side of the petal. (If you wrap basic frame rows counter-clockwise, you’ll start scalloping on the right side of the leaf instead of the left.) Lay the next row against the petal and measure out the beads needed to reach that 5 bead mark without going above it. The new row of beads should be right at or directly below the 5-bead mark. Notice in Photo 2 that my new row of beads is below the 5-bead mark. Adding another bead to this row would put it above that mark, which you want to avoid. 

NOTE: When measuring out the new row of beads, if the  new row is right at the scallop count, you’ll get a scallop that is more round than a scallop where the new row is a little bit below the count. But you don’t always have a choice. Beads don’t always line up exactly the way you want. Choose whichever is closest to the count without going above it. 

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 2

3. After measuring out the beads for the next row, slide all of the other beads back onto the spool. Measure the working wire to approximately 2 feet (61 cm) and cut from the spool. There should be no beads other than the new row on the working wire. 

4. Pinch the new row of beads flat against the side of the leaf, and use your thumbnail to mark the 5 bead scallop count. This helps hold all the rows in place while pulling on the wire, and guides the working wire between the correct beads. Insert the end of the working wire into the back of the leaf, between the two outer rows, right at that 5 bead count. (Photo 3)

5.  Continue holding the new row and your thumb marking the 5-bead count in place while you pull the working wire all the way through to the front of the leaf. (Photo 4

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 3
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 4

6. Pull the working wire all the way through to the front, then bend it to the side, securing it right below the 5th bead. (Photo 5)

7. Add more beads to the working wire – enough to reach the bottom wire. Push them all the way up the wire so they are as tight against that outer row of beads as possible. You don’t want too much wire showing at the tops of the scallops. Measure the beads carefully.   (Photo 6)

8. The second row in the scallop should fold nicely around the edge of the first row. If you use too few beads, the rows in the scallop will buckle up on top of each other. If you have too many beads you will have a large gap between rows of beads. Too few or too many beads can also push the bottom wire out of alignment, which causes a lop-sided leaf. If the bottom wire does start to lean, straighten it before measuring or wrapping rows. Wrap at a 90 degree angle at the bottom wire to continue the round bottom shape. (Photo 7)

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 5
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 6
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 7

Notice that there are two rows of beads on the same side of the Bottom Wire. Normally, rows will alternate sides. Traditionally, French Beading artists would simply wrap the next scallop right up the other side, but as you can see in Photo 8 this leaves an awkward gap between rows on the right side of the leaf. To get rid of the gap, I will teach you a little tip that comes from my friend, Suzanne Steffenson. 

 

 

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 8

9. If there are any beads on the working wire, remove them and put them back in your bowl or spinner. Insert the end of the working wire into the back of the leaf between the two rows in the scallop. Pull the wire through. (Photos 9 & 10)

10. Pull the wire all the way through to the front and bend it over to the right. It should now be exiting between the two rows in the first scallop instead of beneath them. (Photo 11) This is called re-positioning the working wire. You will only need to do this when there are two rows on the same side of the bottom wire. 

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 9
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 10
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 11

10. Scallop counts are usually a mirror image. So unless stated otherwise, make the scallop on the second half of the leaf match the first. The only exception is the mirror image of the first scallop. I like to make my first scallops somewhat even with each other. However, since the outer row on the right side of the leaf is higher up than the outer row on the left side, using the same bead count will put the mirror scallop up higher. I find I usually have to adjust the bead count by 1, sometimes 2 beads, just with the first scallop on the second side. (Photo 12) You can see here that I counted 6 beads down, rather than 5, to keep the scallops at the same height. 

11. Set the scallop. (Photo 13)

12. Add more beads to the working wire and fold them close down the side to make the second row of beads in the scallop. Wrap at the bottom wire to complete the scallop. (Photo 14) You will not need to re-position the working wire after the matching scallop because there are not two rows of beads on the same side of the bottom wire. 

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 12
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 13
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 14

13. The second scallop count is 7. Count 7 beads down from the top of the first scallop. Measure the beads in the new row to meet that point and remove any excess beads (Photo 15). 

14. Set the scallop just below the 7 bead mark. Add more beads to the working wire and fold them back down the side of the leaf to the bottom wire. Wrap at the bottom wire and re-position the working wire. (Photo 16)

15. Make a matching scallop on the right side. (Photo 16)

16. The third scallop count is 9. Count 9 beads down from the top of the previous scallop, measure the beads needed and remove any excess beads. (Photo 17

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 15
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 16
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 17

17. Complete the scallop, re-position the working wire, then make the matching scallop on the opposite side. The finished leaf is shown in Photo 18

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 18

Using French Beaded Scallops With Other Base Techniques

Of course, you can use Scallops with techniques other than Basic Frame. Here are a couple examples.

Photo 19 shows an example of Scallops with Continuous Wraparound Loops

Photo 20 shows an example of Scallops with Continuous Basic Frame

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 19
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 20

Winged Scallops

Winged Scallops are an easy modification of regular French Beaded scallops which create a sharper and longer tip on each scallop. It can also be used to create a look similar to a loop-back. 

To make a winged scallop:

  1. Set the scallop as normal following the scallop count in the pattern. 
  2.  Add more beads to the working wire, but instead of folding straight down around the side, bring the wire up. (Photo 21). 
  3. The pattern should tell you how high to make the wing. For this example, let’s use 5 beads. Count 5 beads up the working wire, then bend the wire sharply back down, creating an extended tip on the scallop. (Photo 22)
  4. Pinch the tip closed then fold the scallop down the side of the leaf as normal. (Photo 23)
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 21
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 22
free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 23

Photo 24 shows an example of a leaf that uses winged scallops. 

If you’ve mastered the French Beaded Scallop technique, move on to learn about ruffles in Lesson Four

free french beading tutorial - scallop technique by Lauren Harpster
PHOTO 24

© 2018 Lauren Harpster / Bead & Blossom. The images and written instructions are copyright protected. This tutorial may not be printed and distributed for personal gain or teaching classes, but feel free to print a copy for personal use. The images may not be uploaded onto other websites. If you would like to share the tutorial, please do so with a link! 

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